Schaefer: Canelo’s win over Trout took him to a new level

Canelo arrives(Photo credit: Esther Lin/Showtime) Golden Boy Promotions CEO Richard Schaefer thinks WBA/WBC junior middleweight champion Saul “Canelo” Alvarez’s 12 round unanimous decision win over former WBA junior middleweight champion Austin Trout last April established the 22-year-old Canelo as a fighter that is for a real.

Schaefer thinks the popularity that the red-haired Mexican fighter now has will possibly catapult him and Floyd Mayweather Jr. into breaking the 6-year pay per view record of 2.4 million buys set by Mayweather and Oscar De La Hoya in 2007.

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Canelo-Trout Post-Fight Press Conference Interviews and Photos

San Antonio, TX finished its eventful boxing week on 04/20/13 Saturday night in front of nearly 40,000 fans at the Alamodome. The televised bouts of the Showtime Championship Boxing telecast included two fights that showed the reason why the fans came out to pack the venue.

The co-main event included a 1st round domination by Omar “Panterita” Figueroa, Jr. over Puerto Rican Abner Cotto. The thrilling first round included a knockdown of Abner Cotto halfway through the round. That exciting moment led to a culmination of the fight with “Panterita’s” vicious left hand body shot that sent Cotto to the ground towards the end of the round. Cotto was unable to survive the body shot as the referee completed a full ten count. This was definitely Figueroa’s coming out party as one of the rising stars in the lighter weights.

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Canelo Alvarez – Austin Trout Recap

17The best way to score a boxing match would probably be to have each fighter begin the event by punching all three judges (jabs, uppercuts, straights, hooks, etc.) to aid the judges in answering the mythical question hanging over every fight of punch valuation—how many of fighter A’s jabs equal an uppercut of fighter B, etc.. Now, there are many practical concerns with enacting such a policy—for example, who will judge the fight should the judges get knocked out? So, absent that, the next most logical way seems to be to simply watch how each fighter responds to other’s punches—thereby sorting out not only when a punch is thrown, but whether it lands in a clean, effective manner. Fortunately, the human body reacts in predictable ways when struck with clean, effective punches—knees buckle, the head gets snapped back, the body is staggered, or in some cases knocked down.

The Canelo Alvarez—Austin Trout tilt from Saturday night bears, according to some, the “controversial” label, but it shouldn’t. Though Alvarez found his target less frequently than Trout (124 versus 154 in total punches landed), he clearly landed more of the clean, effective punches described in the above paragraph—and if you didn’t see that then you either didn’t watch the whole fight, are one of the two judges who somehow thought Chavez swung-and-missed his way to a draw with Whitaker a decade ago, or got distracted trying to figure out if Trout has a Mohawk or just a receding hairline that looks like a Mohawk—while Trout held a decisive edge in insignificant punches landed (the kind where the guy getting hit doesn’t react or seem to care).

Read moreCanelo Alvarez – Austin Trout Recap

Alvarez Shows New Side in Win Over Trout

DSC_8257The slick boxing Trout did what he was supposed to do. In front of 40,000 plus fans at the Alamodome, San Antonio, Texas, he controlled the distance and pace with his jab. He mixed it up, going often to the body. He threw more punches, displayed better combination punching, but he still lost the fight! How could that happen?

It happened because Saul “Canelo” Alvarez impressed a lot of people, including the judges, that he’s a pretty damn good defensive fighter as well as an aggressive one. Several times, Trout ripped off four and five punch combinations, and none landed. Then, just enough times, Canelo would land one of his sharper, more powerful shots. When his shots landed, they had an obvious effect on Trout, and would shake him from his shoe laces to the sweat on his brow. One particularly impressive shot occurred early into the seventh round. Trout carelessly threw out a rather soft jab from his southpaw stance, and Canelo followed it back with a sharp, straight right. Canelo’s punch landed right on the chin. It took Trout’s body a fraction of a second to react, but once it did, it resulted in an awkward little dance, which ended with “No Doubt” on the canvas.

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Open Scoring Experiment: Did it Ruin the Alvarez-Trout Finish?

11The highly anticipated junior middleweight unification showdown between WBC champion Saul Alvarez and WBA titlist Austin ‘No Doubt’ Trout started on a dramatic note before the action even got underway. The atmosphere at the Alamodome was simply electrifying. The high energy and intensity that exuded during the build-up to the opening bell was so powerful that it could even be felt by the television viewing audience, and it was contagious. Although this was not a hugely publicized contest that created massive appeal among casual fans, the entire event still possessed a magical mainstream vibe that almost helped make it seem far larger in its actual scope. The stage seemed set for something special.

The fight itself was a pretty good one, too. It was a classic competitive clash of contrasting styles, making close rounds very difficult to score. Trout was looking to work behind an active jab and keep Canelo at the end of it to maintain optimal range. Alvarez sought to avoid incoming fire and quietly sneak his way in to a more favorable distance where his explosive punching power could be better utilized. Both boxers had success at various points, with the nature of their styles dictating that Trout would control the action for longer stretches, but Alvarez’s superior pop made his moments more memorable. It was a close fight that became a chess match of sorts, with tactical maneuvering, several momentum shifts, adjustments and counter adjustments, a knockdown (scored by Alvarez in the seventh), and a fine overall display of skills and natural talent.

Read moreOpen Scoring Experiment: Did it Ruin the Alvarez-Trout Finish?

Canelo’s performance disappointing in “win” over Trout

08I must say I’m really disappointed in WBC junior middleweight champion Saul “Canelo” Alvarez’s performance tonight in his controversial 12 round unanimous decision over WBA junior middleweight champion Austin Trout (26-1, 14 KO’s) at the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas.

I had expected a lot better from Canelo than what I saw tonight. His stamina was horrible, his defense good, but his work rate was very poor. Canelo fought in a very lazy manner with him reminding me a lot of former IBF middleweight champion Arthur Abraham the way that he failed to be busy and would get rounds given to him based on a tiny handful of landed power shots.

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Day 2: Canelo-Trout Fight Week – Final Press Conference

IMG_4802The boxing buzz continued in San Antonio, TX with Day 2 of the Saul Alvarez VS. Austin Trout fight week. Day 2 consisted of the Final Press Conference to officially provide closing remarks from the fighters, trainers and promotion managers. Media members from all avenues ranging from television stations/networks, news columnists, internet media and local broadcasting gathered to provide exclusive coverage of the Super Middleweight unification showdown taking place in a few days at the Alamodome.

If media individuals were expecting scuffles and bittersweet trash talking from either camp, those individuals were surely disappointed. On the contrary, all of the fighters and camp members, along with promotional representatives, exerted the utmost professionalism towards their opponents and media members. With over 35,000 tickets already sold and countless viewers scheduled to tune in on the Showtime Championship Boxing telecast, this event requires no additional tactics to promote itself.

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Trout: What’s Canelo going to do when things don’t go his way on April 20th?

canelo211WBA World junior middleweight champion Austin Trout (26-0, 14 KO’s) thinks his opponent WBC junior middleweight champion Saul “Canelo” Alvarez (41-0-1, 30 KO’s) won’t be able to make the right adjustments when things don’t go his way this month in their fight on April 20th at the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas.

Trout sees Canelo as being someone that has only gear and can’t adapt to different situations, especially when all of a sudden he is getting out-boxed for the first time in his career. Canelo badly wants to beat Trout because he defeated his brother Rigoberto Alvarez two years ago in winning an easy 12 round unanimous decision to capture the vacant WBA junior middleweight title in 2011.

Read moreTrout: What’s Canelo going to do when things don’t go his way on April 20th?

Lederman sees Canelo obliterating Trout on 4/20

alvarez346HBO broadcaster Harold Lederman doesn’t see WBA light middleweight champion Austin Trout (26-0, 14 KO’s) having much of any chance this month in his fight with WBC light middleweight champion Saul “Canelo” Alvarez (41-0-1, 32 KO’s) on April 20th at the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas. Lederman thinks the 22-year-old Canelo will overpower Trout and get an easy knockout win. I imagine Lederman is putting Trout in the same class as light welterweight Josesito Lopez, who Canelo just annihilated in five rounds last September.

Lederman said to Hustleboss.com “I hate to say this but I think Canelo’s going to destroy him…Canelo’s something special…Canelo is a star. He can box, he can move, he can punch…he fights like a veteran that’s 35.”

Read moreLederman sees Canelo obliterating Trout on 4/20

Canelo vs. Trout: 31,000 tickets already sold for April 20th bout

canelo11Tickets are still going fast for the April 20th unification bout between WBC junior middleweight champion Saul “Canelo” Alvarez (41-0-1, 30 KO’s) and unbeaten WBA junior middleweight champion Austin Trout (26-0, 14 KO’s) at the Alamodome, in San Antonio, Texas, USA. 31,500 tickets have already been purchased for the fight.

Mike Battah of Battah Promotions said to the elpasotimes.com “We’ve sold 31.500 tickets at this point. We’re currently building a new section that will seat 3,000. We’re considering opening up some of the higher levels as well. And, we might still open up seats to view the fight on a big screen.”

Read moreCanelo vs. Trout: 31,000 tickets already sold for April 20th bout