Pacquiao Agrees to 55-45 Split to Fight Mayweather

By John G. Thompson: Filipino Congressman, eight division champion, and pound-for-pound great Manny “Pac Man” Pacquiao (54-4-2, 38 KO’s) appeared on ESPN2’s “First Take” this past Thursday and announced something which could help make the long anticipated fight between him and fellow pound-for-pound great and five division champion Floyd “Money” Mayweather Jr. (43-0, 26 KO’s) actually materialize.

Pacquiao publicly announced that he is willing to cede the majority of revenue the fight would generate to Mayweather, who has been unwilling to fight under the normal 50-50 split. Though an even split is customary for two champions, Mayweather argued that his fights generate more revenue, and based on the numbers he is correct. Pacquiao stated that he would be willing to take a 55-45 split, possibly easing the barriers preventing a showdown between boxing’s two top stars.

Another point of contention from Mayweather has been Pacquiao’s refusal to accept random drug tests. Just to put this issue to rest as well, Pacquiao reiterated in the interview that he would be willing to submit himself for random drug testing. It seems that many fans are not up to date with this issue, so just for a little background: Mayweather and Pacquiao have attempted negotiations for this fight numerous times over the past few years. Mayweather accused Pacquiao of taking performance enhancing substances and demanded random drug testing from the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA).

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Ricky Hatton wants Mayweather, Pacquiao, Khan and Brook

Floyd Mayweather Jr - Floyd Mayweather JrBy Michael Collins: Ricky Hatton (45-2, 32 KO’s) is like a big kid in a candy store now that he’s decided to make a comeback on November 24th against who knows what kind of opponent. Hatton, 33, will be fighting in Manchester, England on the 24th of November and his opponent will probably be a soft touch brought in for him to shake off the ring rust from three years of inactivity huge weight gain. Hatton says he’s interested in facing Amir Khan, Floyd Mayweather Jr., Manny Pacquiao and Kell Brook. That’s a pretty impressive list I must say, but I don’t know that Hatton’s chances are good at beating any of them.

Even a fragile chinned Khan or the stamina plagued Brook could be enough to trip Hatton up before he’s had the chance to make the really cash in fights against Mayweather and/or Pacquiao. If Hatton is serious about wanting Mayweather or Pacquiao, he’s going to need to skip the Khan and Brook fights and go straight to Mayweather or Pacquiao. Those guys are getting older and it’s doubtful they’ll be hanging around too much longer.

Hatton told the Manchester Evening News “I’d love to get a crack at them [Khan and Brook]. I dream about another go at Mayweather and Pacquiao, without a doubt. The ultimate goal is to redeem myself.”

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Bradley targeting Mayweather Jr

By Marcus Richardson: Tim Bradley is now officially out of the running for a mega fight against Manny Pacquiao for December 8th. Bradley had to wait around for months to finally discover that he’s not going to get the fight. Needless to say he’s not happy about being passed over by Pacquiao and his promoter Bob Arum for the big money rematch. However, Bradley is now hoping to hit the ground running by getting an even better money fight against Floyd Mayweather Jr.

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Robert Guerrero wants Broner to come up to 147 lbs to face him; sees Mayweather as possible fight

Floyd Mayweather Jr - Floyd Mayweather JrBy Michael Collins: WBC interim welterweight champion Robert Guerrero (30-1-1, 18 KO’s) wants former WBO super featherweight champion Adrien Broner to come up all the way to welterweight to fight him without a catchweight. Guerrero feels that Broner, who has never even fought at lightweight, should move up from super featherweight three divisions to face him at welterweight. Why Guerrero doesn’t want to meet Broner at a catchweight is unclear but you have to wonder if he’s worried about how he would performance against Broner if a catchweight were used.

Guerrero also thinks a fight between him and unbeaten WBC welterweight champion Floyd Mayweather Jr. is possible, saying to Ryan Maquinana at csnbayarea.com “It’s possible to make the fight. Everything’s there to do the fight. I just think he might go out without a fight, just give up the [WBC] title. We’ll see what happens…If he wants it, he can come get it.”

Guerrero is referring to his interim WBC title. Why Mayweather would want that title when he has the full WBC title is the big question. I think Guerrero is wrong about Mayweather losing his title. The World Boxing Council might be a little reluctant to strip Mayweather given the huge sanctioning fees they can get for his fights. I think Mayweather getting stripped of his WBC title would be something that might take a long time to happen, because Guerrero just doesn’t bring in the same kind of money that Mayweather does. sure, the WBC can strip Mayweather of his title and then give it to Guerrero, but what will they have then? Guerrero barely beat Selcuk Aydin in his last fight.

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Pacquiao may have to swallow his pride to get Mayweather fight done next year

Floyd Mayweather Jr - Floyd Mayweather JrBy Rob Smith: If Manny Pacquiao and his promoter Bob Arum want to get Floyd Mayweather Jr. into the ring for a big cash fight next year then they’re going to have to play it by Mayweather’s rules by taking the smaller cut, because he no longer sees Pacquiao on the same level as him.

Mayweather told Hot97 FM NY, “Actually, we don’t do the same type of numbers, so how can we split? We don’t draw the same type of money.”

That would suggest that Pacquiao and Arum going to have to back off their request of a 50-50 purse split with Mayweather if they want the fight to get made. It’s still possible that Arum can put the fight together but he and Pacquiao will have to swallow their pride and come in with a much lower figure, perhaps as low as 35 percent of the pie. That’s still more than a bargain for a fighter with four losses and who is coming off of a defeat against Tim Bradley. Pacquiao won’t be able to make that kind of money against anyone else, and he could end up in a bad situation if he loses to the next opponent that Arum lines up for him in December.

In this case, Pacquiao would be better off taking whatever crumbs Mayweather throws him because he won’t be able to bargain at all, period. It’s bad enough right now with Pacquiao losing to Bradley, and the fight drawing only 700,000 PPV buys.

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Ricky Hatton needs Khan, Mayweather or Cotto for comeback fight

Floyd Mayweather Jr - Floyd Mayweather JrBy Michael Collins: The rumors persist about former two division world champion Ricky Hatton (45-2, 32 KO’s) staging a comeback in the next couple of months. Hatton looks in incredible shape having burned off a thick layer of flab that covered his once muscular physique and it’s hard to imagine that he’s just taking off the weight just for the sake of living a healthy life. It’s unclear why Hatton would come back at this time, but perhaps he wants to prove to himself that he can put in a better effort than he did in losing to Manny Pacquiao in his last fight in 2009.

Hatton, now 33, probably needs to go for the biggest fight possible if he does decide to make a comeback. It’s too risky for him to take on a guy like Paulie Malignaggi, who won’t bring in the big cash because he lacks the huge star appeal needed to really rake in the cash. Hatton can’t afford to take a lesser fighter because at this point he could lose to almost anybody he fights because of the time he’s been out of the ring. What Hatton needs is someone like Miguel Cotto, Amir Khan or Floyd Mayweather Jr.

A fight against Mayweather would be the ideal situation for Hatton, because it would bring in the most money possible and Mayweather let Hatton hang around for the full 12 rounds instead of trying to drill him into the canvas early.

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Sergio Martinez hoping that win over Chavez Jr. will lead to Mayweather fight

Floyd Mayweather Jr - Floyd Mayweather JrBy Rob Smith: Sergio Martinez (49-2-2, 28 KO’s) has some really big hopes for what a win over WBC middleweight champion Julio Cesar Chavez Jr (46-0-1, 32 KO’s) will potentially do for him when he meets Chavez Jr. on September 15th in Las Vegas, Nevada. Martinez, 37, sees a victory over the young 26-year-old Chavez Jr. as something that could open doors for him to land a big fight against Floyd Mayweather Jr. and if not it could put him on the doorstep to a big money fight.

Martinez said on Max Kellerman’s Face off on HBO to Chavez Jr “After I beat you, I will be nipping on Mayweather’s heals.”

So is Martinez deluded about his aspirations of wanting to get a big money fight against Mayweather? We’ve seen Robert Guerrero talking up a fight with Mayweather recently, and it’s pretty clear that Guerrero has no chances of ever landing that fight unless Mayweather wants decides on taking an easy stay fight. The 37-year-old Martinez could also be kidding himself if he thinks that Mayweather will show any interest in fighting him.

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Will Pacquiao and Mayweather EVER fight?

By Robert Jackson: 3 days and counting to Money Mayweather’s release from Las Vegas County Jail…unless he beats up a guard between now and then. Well anyway, upon Mayweather’s release the boxing world will be wondering whom Lil Floyd will fight next, and whether he’ll be fighting again in 2012.

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All Time Historical Survey Series Recap – The Original 8 Weight Classes & P4P

Floyd Mayweather Jr - Floyd Mayweather Jr

by Geoffrey Ciani – Over the course of a sixteen month period beginning in June 2009, I conducted a series of surveys that all began with a very simple question: Who are the ten best heavyweights of all time? While contemplating my own list of top heavyweight pugilists, I decided gathering the input of others might help display a more accurate portrayal of what a ‘true’ top 10 list should look like. Now of course this is not an exact science by any means. In fact, quite the opposite, it is an extremely subjective topic that is often skewed by personal bias, differences of opinion, individual tastes and preferences, and most importantly the absence of a universally agreed upon criteria with which to judge past fighters. Even with these inherent obstacles playing their natural role, however, we can still establish some degree of consensus.

The guidelines were simple. I had every person who voluntarily participated in each survey provide me with a chronological list of who they considered to be the ten best (heavyweights, middleweights, etc) in boxing history. Ties were not permitted, just a straight-forward list from one to ten. I then used a weighted-points system to assign values to fighters based on where they appeared on each individual’s list. First place votes received 25 points. Second place votes were worth 15 points, third place votes were 12, and fourth and fifth place votes were worth 10 and 8 points respectively. After that, the point differential was constant, with sixth place votes getting 5 points, seventh place votes getting 4, eighth getting 3, ninth place 2, and tenth place 1.

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