Spence-Jr. vs Peterson Preview: Sometimes Theater Of The Expected Is Still Worth Watching

I can't speak for anyone else, but sometimes, I find myself wanting to watch something a little predictable on TV or in the theater. Don't get me wrong-I have nothing against plot twists or character development and certainly enjoy watching shows that contain those elements. Still, I find it fun to occasionally watch something where the outcome is a foregone conclusion, just because I know it will contain enough entertaining moments to make it worth my time.

I can’t speak for anyone else, but sometimes, I find myself wanting to watch something a little predictable on TV or in the theater. Don’t get me wrong-I have nothing against plot twists or character development and certainly enjoy watching shows that contain those elements. Still, I find it fun to occasionally watch something where the outcome is a foregone conclusion, just because I know it will contain enough entertaining moments to make it worth my time.

Read moreSpence-Jr. vs Peterson Preview: Sometimes Theater Of The Expected Is Still Worth Watching

Bullets and Butterfly Wings: A Preview of Saturday Night’s Fights

On November 16, 1974, an accomplished Thai kickboxer named Saensak Maungsaurin made his professional boxing debut against a young California-based Filipino named Rudy Barro. Barro's record of 14-9 going into the bout wasn't particularly glittering, but he was on a four fight win streak, including a victory over an undefeated, highly ranked Jimmy Heair that propelled him to a top five ranking in the lightweight division. So, there was reason to believe that Saensak was taking on more than he could handle by facing Barro without any prior boxing experience; and for the first minute of their fight that very much appeared to be the case. Barro steamed forward and pelted his slower rival with right hands and combinations; after about two minutes of this, he drove his opponent into the ropes and stepped forward to finish matters off...

On November 16, 1974, an accomplished Thai kickboxer named Saensak Maungsaurin made his professional boxing debut against a young California-based Filipino named Rudy Barro. Barro’s record of 14-9 going into the bout wasn’t particularly glittering, but he was on a four fight win streak, including a victory over an undefeated, highly ranked Jimmy Heair that propelled him to a top five ranking in the lightweight division. So, there was reason to believe that Saensak was taking on more than he could handle by facing Barro without any prior boxing experience; and for the first minute of their fight that very much appeared to be the case. Barro steamed forward and pelted his slower rival with right hands and combinations; after about two minutes of this, he drove his opponent into the ropes and stepped forward to finish matters off…

Read moreBullets and Butterfly Wings: A Preview of Saturday Night’s Fights

Winning Ugly: “The Kapt’n” Huck decisions Kucher

Anyone who has followed the course of Marco Huck's dozen year, fourty-four bout boxing career is likely to say a couple of things about him as a fighter.

Anyone who has followed the course of Marco Huck’s dozen year, fourty-four bout boxing career is likely to say a couple of things about him as a fighter.

The first thing that can be said is that his style isn’t the most aesthetically pleasing to watch. In fact, I’m being charitable when I write that. Huck’s approach to fighting isn’t pretty at all. It’s actually quite the opposite. This is a fighter who often lunges in awkwardly with rainbow right hands and wide volleys of hooks, and who spends a lot of time grappling and mauling opponents in close, all the while clubbing them with whatever hand might be free at the time. He’s an unorthodox and occasionally crude brawler who doesn’t seem particularly concerned about the rules at any given point, or about where his punches might make contact on his foe’s person. Really, to say Huck (40-3-1, 27 KO’s) isn’t at all pretty is probably understating matters. To refer to his style as being “bowling shoe ugly” is much better way of describing him in action.

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PBC on ESPN Preview: One Last Shot For The Road

This evening, at Verona's Turning Stone Casino, a  promising featherweight  named Miguel Flores (20-0,9KO's) will face against another prospect with some talent, "The Polish Prince" Ryan Kielczweski (25-1,7 KO's), in the main event of Premier Boxing Champion's latest card. Based on what I've seen of these two, this seems like a good, even match-up between two similarly talented boxers. Of equal importance, it's got the potential to be fun to watch given their respective styles. Flores appears to be the superior technician, but Kielcweski seems to have the edge in terms of speed and mobility. Neither of them possesses world ending power, but they've both proved themselves to be willing to engage in the trenches when required, and capable of returning fire after getting tagged.

This evening, at Verona’s Turning Stone Casino, a promising featherweight named Miguel Flores (20-0,9KO’s) will face against another prospect with some talent, “The Polish Prince” Ryan Kielczweski (25-1,7 KO’s), in the main event of Premier Boxing Champion’s latest card. Based on what I’ve seen of these two, this seems like a good, even match-up between two similarly talented boxers. Of equal importance, it’s got the potential to be fun to watch given their respective styles. Flores appears to be the superior technician, but Kielcweski seems to have the edge in terms of speed and mobility. Neither of them possesses world ending power, but they’ve both proved themselves to be willing to engage in the trenches when required, and capable of returning fire after getting tagged.

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Rumble, Young Men, Rumble: Vargas And Salido Go To War

This article isn't quite what I had intended to write earlier in the week.

This article isn’t quite what I had intended to write earlier in the week.

Initially, I had wanted to write about last night’s clash for the WBC 130lb championship that pitted the undefeated title-holder Francisco “Bandido” Vargas and the grizzled, battle-hardened Orlando “Siri” Salido. It was a match-up between two Mexican fighters with some measure of skill and an abundance of will; and I knew that all hell would break loose the moment one of them managed to land a good punch. It carried the promise of excitement and intensity, and it elicited a sense of anticipation in me that I hadn’t felt about a boxing match in quite some time.

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Showtime Triple Header Preview: It May Not Be A Hell Of A Card, But it’s Still Really Good

One of the best known quotes in A.J. Liebling's immortal "The Sweet Science" concerned a tough, tricky welterweight contender from the 1950's named Billy Graham, whom he famously described as being "as good a fighter as one possibly can be without being a hell of a fighter."

One of the best known quotes in A.J. Liebling’s immortal “The Sweet Science” concerned a tough, tricky welterweight contender from the 1950’s named Billy Graham, whom he famously described as being “as good a fighter as one possibly can be without being a hell of a fighter.”

These words have resonated with me ever since I first read them, for they serve as the perfect way to characterize those boxers who lack any one outstanding attribute yet are still capable of achieving success in the ring. For me, those are the fighters who are most compelling. It always intrigues me to watch fighters who rely upon their intangibles like grit, guile, and ring generalship to win fights; and it always captures my attention when these types of boxers are pitted against those who are talented enough to be considered “a hell of a fighter”.

Read moreShowtime Triple Header Preview: It May Not Be A Hell Of A Card, But it’s Still Really Good