Manny Has Become The Current Day John L Sullivan Assigned To The Task Of Dethroning The Current Day Jack Johnson

Floyd Mayweather Jr, Manny Pacquiao, Mayweather vs. Pacquiao - Let me digress a little by arguing that it is somewhat childish for people of sound mind and discretion to claim one boxer was better than another when they competed in divisions that were so disparately distant in terms of their weight, that it preclude them ever being able to fight each other, even if they existed within the same chronological time line. That is equivalent to arguing that Usain Bolt, a sprinter, was a better athlete than Ethiopian Marathoners Abebe Bikila and Degaga ("Mamo") Wolde, or vice versa. One cannot accurately extrapolate the pugilistic skills and abilities of heavyweight boxers to what they would be if they fought at lightweights, welterweights or middleweights, and vice versa. It is an argument that is as nebulous as one seeking to determine whether John Wayne was faster on the draw than Audie Murphy, simply on the basis of their movie roles. I just had to get that out.

This will be my last article prior to the big day, the big occasion, the event that is being billed and extolled by many as the greatest event in boxing history. I do not necessarily share those sentiments, because, for me, Ali – Frasier 1, Ali – Foreman, Sugar Ray Leonard – Tommy Hearns 1, and Sugar Ray Leonard – Marvin Hagler were events of as great or greater boxing significance. All of the fighters involved in those events had accomplishments greater than Manny Pacquiao, and the legend of some of them probably equaled or exceeded the accomplishments of Floyd Mayweather Jr. Of course Floyd would disagree with this, and he has every right to be. Because his accomplishments are significant, and one can legitimately argue that he is indeed the The Best Ever (TBE).

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Floyd Mayweather – Manny Pacquiao: Bizarre Pre Fight Coverage

Floyd Mayweather Jr, Manny Pacquiao, Mayweather vs. Pacquiao -  When I read sundry articles by some self-styled Boxing Analyst and pundits on the possible outcome in the Floyd Mayweather Junior and Manny Pacquiao fight, I am driven to wonder whether this fight have not propelled us into some kind of surrealism, where the bizarre and the illogical have replaced reason and objectivity in the minds of men. I certainly am not lumping those who simply feel Manny might win, based on their subjective opinions and assessment of the skill set brought to the fight by the two pugilist, in with others who make absurd claims that Floyd has no chance. Yes, one have to expect these kind of convictions from Manny's trainers and his supporters. But one do expect at least a modicum of analytical maturity to be exhibited in the understanding of those who are considered to be boxing analyst and pundits. And what is even more puzzling and shocking, when one considers such an outrageous assessment of Floyd's chances against Manny, is the fact that the chance of victory for virtually every fighter entering the ring, even those with few wins and many losses, are never whittled down to zero. So from whence comes this bizarre pattern of reasoning.

When I read sundry articles by some self-styled Boxing Analyst and pundits on the possible outcome in the Floyd Mayweather Junior and Manny Pacquiao fight, I am driven to wonder whether this fight have not propelled us into some kind of surrealism, where the bizarre and the illogical have replaced reason and objectivity in the minds of men. I certainly am not lumping those who simply feel Manny might win, based on their subjective opinions and assessment of the skill set brought to the fight by the two pugilist, in with others who make absurd claims that Floyd has no chance. Yes, one have to expect these kind of convictions from Manny’s trainers and his supporters. But one do expect at least a modicum of analytical maturity to be exhibited in the understanding of those who are considered to be boxing analyst and pundits. And what is even more puzzling and shocking, when one considers such an outrageous assessment of Floyd’s chances against Manny, is the fact that the chance of victory for virtually every fighter entering the ring, even those with few wins and many losses, are never whittled down to zero. So from whence comes this bizarre pattern of reasoning.

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Mayweather/Pacquiao – From Whence Comes The Hate

Floyd Mayweather Jr, Manny Pacquiao, Mayweather vs. Pacquiao - The contract have been agreed on and signed, a date has been set for the fight, competing cable networks with broadcasting rights of the fights of the two pugilistic competitors have reached agreement on who will air what and when, and we wait in gleeful anticipation for May 2 when this will reach its final culmination in the ring. In the interim, the usual coverage and promoting has gotten into full swing, but with variations that are not exactly standard in this process. But then again, it is a Floyd Mayweather Jr. fight, a boxer who seem to generate more hate and hostility from a boxing public not seen in the US since Cassius Clay refused to step forward on the 28th of April 1967 to be inducted into the US army, citing religious reasons for his objection. No, I certainly am not inferring that Floyd Mayweather Jr. is a current day replica of Muhammed Ali. I am contending there are similarities in the visceral expositions of hate and hostility directed at him, as that which we saw during that Muhammed Ali era.

The contract have been agreed on and signed, a date has been set for the fight, competing cable networks with broadcasting rights of the fights of the two pugilistic competitors have reached agreement on who will air what and when, and we wait in gleeful anticipation for May 2 when this will reach its final culmination in the ring. In the interim, the usual coverage and promoting has gotten into full swing, but with variations that are not exactly standard in this process. But then again, it is a Floyd Mayweather Jr. fight, a boxer who seem to generate more hate and hostility from a boxing public not seen in the US since Cassius Clay refused to step forward on the 28th of April 1967 to be inducted into the US army, citing religious reasons for his objection. No, I certainly am not inferring that Floyd Mayweather Jr. is a current day replica of Muhammed Ali. I am contending there are similarities in the visceral expositions of hate and hostility directed at him, as that which we saw during that Muhammed Ali era.

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