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Sam Soliman: The Triple A Man

If any current fighter deserved to win a world title it was Sam “King” Soliman. The inspirational Australian won the IBF middleweight championship with a unanimous decision over Felix Sturm in Germany last Saturday night.

While the forty year old Soliman’s performance was convincing it was hardly surprising as the veteran has always been a remarkable Prize Fighter.

Debuting as a professional in April 1997 after going 84-11 as an amateur boxer and grinding out a successful career in the Kick Boxing Arena, Sam has always been a Triple A Man: “Anyone, Anywhere, Anytime”. Continue reading

Erik Morales: an appreciation

A report from ESPN Deportes says that Mexican fighting legend and former four-weight champion Erik Morales has decided to call it quits on his fantastic career, dispensing with a planned farewell fight in his homeland. Morales, aged 37, walks away with an incredibly hard-fought 52-9(36) record – and “El Terrible’s” induction into The Hall of Fame is an absolute certainty when the appropriate five years have passed.

Turning pro in his native Tijuana in March of 19993 when he was just 16-years-old, Morales KO’d a guy named Jose Orejel inside a couple of rounds and reportedly spent his meagre payday on chewing gum. It wasn’t long at all before the tall and skinny, long-armed super-bantamweight was fighting for titles; first Hispano and Mexican belts and then NABF and world titles. Continue reading

Video: Tyson Fury talks Chisora, Haye, Wilder, Klitschko and his Gypsy Curse

BritishBoxers.co.uk caught up with the enjoyable and entertaining Tyson Fury; the young man who is clearly working hard, thinking about his future, and is learning to have fun with the media. Tyson admits to hating press conferences, “Being lucky” in every single one of his fights, having limited skills, being scared of Dereck Chisora, and to simply “being in it for the money”. He even attributes his wins to a mysterious Gypsy Curse. And if you believe any of it, I’ve got some magic beans I want to sell you.

Tyson talks candidly (does he know any other way?) about Wladimir Klitschko not wanting to spar him, Deontay Wilder being more deserving of a world title shot than himself, and says he is up for a fight with David Haye despite a fight between the pair already falling through twice before. Continue reading

Schaefer’s split affecting Pacquiao, Marquez?

The boxing world is abuzz, and not in any way related to an upcoming fight or even a specific fighter. Richard Schaefer, the man who worked tirelessly to promote Golden Boy Promotions to the powerhouse that it is today, has left the company. Many are confused about what’s happening today, and how Al Haymon’s and Floyd Mayweather’s decisions will affect future business.

But hopefully, it’s not all bad. After all, if things work out properly, then this means that Golden Boy fighters can now take on Top Rank fighters; the kind of thing fans have been yearning for. If we assume that all the fighters we think to be Golden Boy signed are indeed Golden Boy signed (something Schaefer said was not necessarily true) and that they can peacefully agree on a TV network to fight on, where does this leave Top Rank’s two biggest fighters? Continue reading

Cotto vs. Martinez: Will Sergio punch his ticket to Canastota with a win over Miguel Cotto?

So many questions linger in the lead up for the HBO PPV battle between Miguel Cotto and Sergio Martinez broadcasting live from Madison Square Garden this Saturday night.

Will Cotto’s face hold up under constant fire from accurate combination punching of Maravilla? Can Martinez make it through a whole fight without his knee flaring up? Is Sergio Martinez’s career already Hall of Fame worthy or does he need to secure a win against Miguel Cotto to help him get over that hump?

Age is more of a factor for Sergio but physically even with Martinez’s recent string of injuries, Miguel’s fighter body may be the more shopworn of the two having engaged in many brutal wars over the years. Continue reading

Weigh-In: “Knockout” Reality Show Finals with Floyd Mayweather Sr.

On June 6, 2014, boxers weighed in at Casino Miami Jai-Alai in anticipation of NUVOtv’s Saturday broadcast.
The fighters were professional and focused. There was no pushing or trash-talking, and very little posturing. Floyd Mayweather Sr. even refrained from reciting his poetry.

“Water, Pedialyte, and Gatorade is all you can drink,” shouted Jorge Curtiellas of the Florida Boxing Commission to the crowd of fighters, trainers and corner men. “Once you get to the ring, only water.”

“There’s all these drinks with God-knows-what in them,” Curtiellas said on the side. “Water, Pedialite, and Gatorade. We know what’s in those.” Continue reading

Martinez vs Cotto Weigh-In Photos and Video

Saturday’s HBO Pay-Per-View telecast begins at 9:00 p.m. ET/PT with fights from the “Mecca of Boxing” – Madison Square Garden in New York City.

The main event of the evening features a battle for the middleweight championship of the world when former three-division world champion Miguel Cotto and current middleweight champion Sergio “Maravilla” Martinez meet in a 159-pound fight scheduled for 12 rounds.

Official Weights from New York:

Miguel Cotto: 155 lbs.
Sergio Martinez: 158.8 lbs. Continue reading

What If A Fight That Never Happened Actually Did Happen? Joe Frazier Vs Ken Norton

There are some fights that were possible but they never happened. In the case of Joe Frazier verses Ken Norton a little bit of alternative revisionist history is needed to set the stage for the fight to have happened. The following, of course, is fiction and it is my take on how such a fight may have transpired.

It is May 1974 and former heavyweight champion Joe Frazier is in training to fight fellow highly ranked contender Jerry Quarry who had defeated up and coming contenders Earnie Shavers and Ron Lyle the previous year. Frazier, who was fresh off a loss to fellow ex champion Muhammad Ali, knew a win over Quarry would solidify another heavyweight title shot against the man who had brutally taken his title from him, George Foreman. But as luck would have it Quarry, who was prone to cuts, was cut while training and the injury was severe enough to sideline him for the next couple of months. Frazier was told by several promoters and by representatives of the major sanctioning bodies that he had to beat a top ranked contender in order to be considered for another title shot. But the problem was that if Quarry, who fit the bill, was not available, and both Lyle and Shavers who had already been beaten by Quarry had slipped in the rankings, who was available for Frazier to fight? Continue reading

Ten years ago today: Oscar De La Hoya scrapes past Felix Sturm in Las Vegas

A decade ago today, Oscar De La Hoya, the number-one star and Box Office draw of the sport, fought a then largely unknown Felix Sturm in what was “The Golden Boy’s” first fight up at middleweight.

For De La Hoya, the fight, held at The MGM Grand in Las Vegas, was supposed to be a high-level “warm up” for an assault on world middleweight king Bernard Hopkins’ belts (B-Hop defeated Robert Allen on the same card that June night in 2004), but the fight turned out to be much more than that.

Challenging the 20-0 German for the WBO belt, De La Hoya came in looking overweight and sluggish and he came within a whisker of paying the price and blowing the Hopkins mega-match. Sturm may have been unknown, but he had behind him a superb amateur career and he unveiled his skills against the 36-3 superstar who, at age 31 was six years his senior. Sturm boxed behind his superb left jab, out-punched De La Hoya, marked him up around the eye and generally appeared to boss the fight. Continue reading

Tommy Brooks: This time next year David Price will be ready for Klitschko

Tommy Brooks knows a thing or two about heavyweights. The legendary American coach has trained a who’s who of heavyweight greats including Evander Holyfield, Mike Tyson and the Klitschko brothers.

Brooks’ latest charge is British heavyweight star David Price (17-2, 15 KOs). Brooks has been overseeing the rebuilding process for the Olympic Bronze medalist, following back-to-back defeats to Tony Thompson.

The rebuilding process continues for Price when he takes on the hard-hitting Yaroslav Zavorotnyi (16-6, 14 KOs) at the Sport and Congress Center in Schwerin, Germany on Saturday, June 7th.

Ahead of Saturday night’s action Brooks offers his perspective on Price’s development. Continue reading