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Austin Trout

Trout vs. Lara on Mayweather Jr. vs. Canelo Undercard?

trout77If the following is true, than the September 14th fight night will be one of the best PPV cards in a very long time.

It appears that Austin Trout might be facing Erislandy Lara at the MGM Grand’s Garden Arena as an undercard fight of the Mayweather Jr. vs. Canelo bout. At this time, while we haven’t yet heard anything solid from the promoters or the fighters themselves, rumors as well as this fight showing as scheduled on BoxRec.com have people buzzing with excitement. Continue reading

The Pugilist KOrner: Austin Trout, Byrd, Molina, More!

The Law Offices of Mario Davila is proud to present former WBA Junior Middleweight Champion Austin “No Doubt” Trout, expert trainer and former 168/175 pound title challenger John “Iceman” Scully, Hall of Fame matchmaker and promoter Don “War a Week” Chargin, former IBF Heavyweight Champion Chris Byrd, Lightweight contender John Molina, and Junior Middleweight prospect Boyd Melson on this week’s edition of “The Pugilist KOrner”!! Continue reading

Schaefer: Canelo’s win over Trout took him to a new level

Canelo arrives(Photo credit: Esther Lin/Showtime) Golden Boy Promotions CEO Richard Schaefer thinks WBA/WBC junior middleweight champion Saul “Canelo” Alvarez’s 12 round unanimous decision win over former WBA junior middleweight champion Austin Trout last April established the 22-year-old Canelo as a fighter that is for a real.

Schaefer thinks the popularity that the red-haired Mexican fighter now has will possibly catapult him and Floyd Mayweather Jr. into breaking the 6-year pay per view record of 2.4 million buys set by Mayweather and Oscar De La Hoya in 2007. Continue reading

Tonight on “The Pugilist KOrner”: Austin Trout, Paulie Malignaggi, Steve Kim, Curtis Stevens, and Jeremy Williams

The Law Offices of Mario Davila is proud to present former WBA Junior Middleweight Champion Austin “No Doubt” Trout, current WBA Junior Welterweight Champion Paulie Malignaggi, boxing journalist Steve “K-9” Kim, Middleweight prospect Curtis Stevens, and Heavyweight Jeremy Williams in tonight’s edition of “The Pugilist KOrner”!!

Pugilist KOrner listener line: 718-506-1506

Tonight’s show will be brought to you by www.incaseofanaccident.com and hosted by Radio commentator James King with Boxing writer and announcer Joseph Herron. Continue reading

Canelo-Trout Post-Fight Press Conference Interviews and Photos

San Antonio, TX finished its eventful boxing week on 04/20/13 Saturday night in front of nearly 40,000 fans at the Alamodome. The televised bouts of the Showtime Championship Boxing telecast included two fights that showed the reason why the fans came out to pack the venue.

The co-main event included a 1st round domination by Omar “Panterita” Figueroa, Jr. over Puerto Rican Abner Cotto. The thrilling first round included a knockdown of Abner Cotto halfway through the round. That exciting moment led to a culmination of the fight with “Panterita’s” vicious left hand body shot that sent Cotto to the ground towards the end of the round. Cotto was unable to survive the body shot as the referee completed a full ten count. This was definitely Figueroa’s coming out party as one of the rising stars in the lighter weights. Continue reading

“Canelo Alvarez vs. Austin Trout” Edition of “The Pugilist KOrner’s: Weekend Wrap”

he Law Offices of Mario Davila is proud to present a special Saul “Canelo” Alvarez vs. Austin “No Doubt” Trout edition of “The Pugilist KOrner’s: Weekend Wrap” tonight at 9:00 PM EST.

Pugilist KOrner listener line: 718-506-1506

During tonight’s broadcast, James and Joseph will talk about unified WBC/WBA Junior Middleweight Champion Saul “Canelo” Alvarez’s controversial UD12 victory over former title holder Austin “No Doubt” Trout, which took place on Saturday, April 20th, at the iconic Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas. Continue reading

Canelo Alvarez – Austin Trout Recap

17The best way to score a boxing match would probably be to have each fighter begin the event by punching all three judges (jabs, uppercuts, straights, hooks, etc.) to aid the judges in answering the mythical question hanging over every fight of punch valuation—how many of fighter A’s jabs equal an uppercut of fighter B, etc.. Now, there are many practical concerns with enacting such a policy—for example, who will judge the fight should the judges get knocked out? So, absent that, the next most logical way seems to be to simply watch how each fighter responds to other’s punches—thereby sorting out not only when a punch is thrown, but whether it lands in a clean, effective manner. Fortunately, the human body reacts in predictable ways when struck with clean, effective punches—knees buckle, the head gets snapped back, the body is staggered, or in some cases knocked down.

The Canelo Alvarez—Austin Trout tilt from Saturday night bears, according to some, the “controversial” label, but it shouldn’t. Though Alvarez found his target less frequently than Trout (124 versus 154 in total punches landed), he clearly landed more of the clean, effective punches described in the above paragraph—and if you didn’t see that then you either didn’t watch the whole fight, are one of the two judges who somehow thought Chavez swung-and-missed his way to a draw with Whitaker a decade ago, or got distracted trying to figure out if Trout has a Mohawk or just a receding hairline that looks like a Mohawk—while Trout held a decisive edge in insignificant punches landed (the kind where the guy getting hit doesn’t react or seem to care). Continue reading

Alvarez Shows New Side in Win Over Trout

DSC_8257The slick boxing Trout did what he was supposed to do. In front of 40,000 plus fans at the Alamodome, San Antonio, Texas, he controlled the distance and pace with his jab. He mixed it up, going often to the body. He threw more punches, displayed better combination punching, but he still lost the fight! How could that happen?

It happened because Saul “Canelo” Alvarez impressed a lot of people, including the judges, that he’s a pretty damn good defensive fighter as well as an aggressive one. Several times, Trout ripped off four and five punch combinations, and none landed. Then, just enough times, Canelo would land one of his sharper, more powerful shots. When his shots landed, they had an obvious effect on Trout, and would shake him from his shoe laces to the sweat on his brow. One particularly impressive shot occurred early into the seventh round. Trout carelessly threw out a rather soft jab from his southpaw stance, and Canelo followed it back with a sharp, straight right. Canelo’s punch landed right on the chin. It took Trout’s body a fraction of a second to react, but once it did, it resulted in an awkward little dance, which ended with “No Doubt” on the canvas. Continue reading